oxalate

PRESS RELEASE: CAPTOZYME SECURES $3.4 MILLION TO CONTINUE ENZYME RESEARCH

GAINESVILLE, FL; January 20, 2017 – Captozyme Inc., a biotechnology company based in Gainesville, FL, recently raised $3.4 million. Captozyme plans to invest this money into the manufacturing and launch of Nephure, an oxalate-degrading enzyme to facilitate a low-oxalate diet.

“We are humbled by the confidence put in us to continue our research and develop products and aid us in getting these products to the marketplace,” says Aaron Cowley, CEO of Captozyme. “Our team has spent significant time and effort in making our products live up to the expectations of our most important stakeholders, the people who are currently struggling on a low-oxalate diet.”

A low-oxalate diet and normal consumption of calcium is useful in normalizing relatively high urinary oxalate. Sticking to the diet can be hard, especially when there can be a wide range of discrepancies online about what food is generally considered oxalate rich. Nephure’s goal is to make being healthier, easier; it takes away this uncertainty by breaking down the oxalate compound in food.

A low-oxalate diet should limit oxalate intake to 40 to 50 mg each day, though in the USA oxalate intake is estimated to average 150-200 mg each day. Captozyme’s pre-clinical data of Nephure features:

  • 40-60% reduction in urinary oxalate when administered to dogs with high urinary oxalate
  • Successful creation of oxalate-free craft beer and ready to drink tea and juices

About Captozyme

Captozyme is a biotechnology company that is dedicated to helping people better manage their diets and overall health. Through Nephure they have created a product that allows people to enjoy the food they love without the consequences of adding oxalate to their body. Learn more about Captozyme at Captozyme.com and stay up to date on Nephure for when it launches in the summer.

Contact:

Aaron Cowley

Captozyme Inc.

785.760.3128

Aaron.cowley@captozyme.com

 

A Low Oxalate Vegetarian Diet

When physicians suggest diets for patients struggling with calcium-oxalate kidney stones, a low oxalate diet is often recommended. However, for vegetarians, this can pose a problem for their lifestyle, as some of the items with the highest levels of oxalate are vegetables or grains, and therefore make such a diet difficult to balance while still staying healthy with other nutrients. Hope is not lost for vegetarians though, and the following is a collection of some tips for a low oxalate diet that doesn’t require you to bite into the forbidden meats.

First, the oxalate content of plants can change depending on the way they’re planted and grown, and can also have their oxalate reduced by boiling or steaming the vegetables, especially the leaves of leafy greens, and then discarding the water. So it’s recommended that if you are going to eat greens with lots of oxalate, to prepare them in this fashion to decrease the amount of oxalate you’re consuming. With that in mind, the list below will describe what to avoid for certain kinds of foods, and what to eat instead to keep a low oxalate diet.

 

Breakfast:

Avoid:

All-bran cereals, and most cereal advertising wheat or grains. Frosted mini-wheats, and most fruit cereals.

Instead Eat:

Eggs, Coconut flour muffins or pancakes, yogurt with mixed fruit (no granola).

Vegetables:

Avoid:

Beans, beets, raw carrots, okra, rhubarb, parsnip, spinach (raw or cooked), tomato sauce, turnips, or yams.

Instead Eat:

Broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, corn, cucumber, lettuce, mushroom, onions, pickles, radish, scallions, green pepper, or zucchini.

In small amounts, eating asparagus, cooked carrots, brussel sprouts, celery, and string beans are acceptable.

Snacks:

Avoid:

Almost all nuts and seeds except for flax seed, peanut butter, desserts such as brownies, cake, chocolate syrup and fudge, and avoid all potato chips.

Instead Eat:

Fig bars, graham crackers, saltines, Triscuits, wheat thins with reduced fat, apple butter, and Ritz crackers. For dessert, jello, Popsicles, sherbet, and vanilla pudding are good alternatives.

Drinks:

Avoid:

Hot chocolate, lemonade, brewed black tea, or V8 juices.

Instead Drink:

Other fruit juices such as apple juice, orange juice, or pineapple juice. In reasonable servings, these are fine. Though slightly controversial, it has been recently argued that coffee has a relatively low oxalate content, and is safe to drink. The most important thing in a low oxalate diet however is to drink lots of water.

Fruits:

Avoid:

Kiwis, dates, raspberries, star fruit, canned and dried pineapple, and dried figs.

Instead Eat:

Apples, grapes, lemons, peaches, plums, watermelons, fresh pineapple, strawberries, bananas, pears, or cherries.

Meals:

Avoid:

Tofu, veggie burgers, lasagna, spaghetti, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and pasta.

Instead Eat:

White rice, macaroni & cheese, popcorn, salads, any of the low oxalate vegetable mentioned, Santa Fe bean salad with black-eyed peas instead of black beans, rice and peas, and eggs in meals are all just a few options.


While it seems like a difficult hurdle to pass, a low oxalate vegetarian diet certainly is not impossible, and there are people willing to help. While most of the items listed were common foods, there are still more foods that have both high and low oxalate contents. So be sure to do some research and ask your doctor for a list of high oxalate foods, and take some time to look into more possible meals yourself.

 

  1. Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Nutrition Department Retrieved from the URL: https://regepi.bwh.harvard.edu/health/Oxalate/files

  2. Norris, Jack, Oxalate, December 2013. Retrieved from the URL: http://veganhealth.org/articles/oxalate

  3. Heidi, Low Oxalate Meal Plans for the Low Oxalate Diet, Low Oxalate Info, October 12, 2012. Retrieved from the URL: http://lowoxalateinfo.com/low-oxalate-meal-plans-for-the-low-oxalate-diet/

Captozyme COO Featured in Florida's High Tech Corridor Magazine

Florida's High Tech Corridor Council has been promoting collaboration among Corridor universities since 1996 and continues to make great achievements in economic development initiatives.

Captozyme is excited to have our COO, Helena Cowley, presented as one of the "Faces of Technology" in this year's publication. 

Shedding Some Light on Kidney Stones

When most people hear of someone with a kidney stone, they often assume that every kidney stone is the same. While easy to assume, this is simply not true, and there are important distinctions to be made for different kinds of kidney stones. Each stone is formed from different kinds of materials, and therefore can be prevented with different diets or interventions. For example, with calcium oxalate stones, one might want to reduce oxalate in the diet. However, if the stone does not include oxalate, then this advice and change in diet would be unnecessary. In order to uncover what type of stone someone has, the type of stone can be determined by a doctor after it has been passed, or by identifying the chemicals in one’s blood or urine.

There are five more common kidney stones, starting with the most common; calcium oxalate.

Calcium oxalate stones are comprised of calcium oxalate, and there are two different forms of this type. Calcium oxalate monohydrate, and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Calcium oxalate monohydrate stones are harder and more resistant to fragmentation, and appear more often with higher levels of oxalate.

Calcium phosphate stones are the second most common stones, and is the bonding of calcium to phosphate instead of oxalate. There are also two different kinds of these stones, and they can form into either brushite or hydroxyapatite. Brushite is extra hard and resistant to shock treatments, while hydroxyapatite can actually plug the kidney tubules and injure kidney cells.

Uric acid kidney stones are about as common as calcium phosphate stones, but are different. Uric acid is a breakdown product of DNA and RNA, and forms when the urine is too acidic. The stones are red or orange, and can form rapidly. Uric acid does not have to bond with any other chemicals like calcium phosphate or oxalate, and therefore can form in seconds, but can also be passed quickly unless the stones are retained in the kidney. If so, they can grow to become quite large. However, since they are dependent on the acidity of the urine, they can be treated with alkali supplement. Occasionally though, uric acid stones might mix with calcium oxalate stones, which can be much more difficult to break up.

The second to last of the more common stones are struvite stones. These kidney stones are a combination of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, and cannot be made by the kidneys themselves. They are only able to exist because of the workings of bacteria. The soil bacteria from outside can find its way into our systems, bringing with it the ability to convert urea to ammonia, which then crystallizes with magnesium and phosphate, which are always found in urine. The stones can become large, and the bacteria can injure the kidneys, or enter the bloodstream and cause sepsis.

The last of these kidney stones are cystine stones, which are only formed in those with cystinuria; an inherited kidney disease. These stones come from cysteine, and grow to be extremely large, grow quickly, and can cause damage to the kidneys cells if not treated.

While these five are the main stones found in humans, there are a few kidney stones that are much more rare, and often are forms of mixed stones. As seen in the varying types of stones, there is much more to the condition than the broad terminology of a simple kidney stone.

 

1. Coe, F. Type of Kidney Stones – A Primer. Retrieved from URL: http://kidneystones.uchicago.edu/types-of-stones/

2. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). (2013 November). Diet for Kidney Stone Prevention. Retrieved from URL: http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/urologic-disease/diet-for-kidney-stone-prevention/Pages/facts.aspx

A New Step in Health

In our modern world, we are almost constantly bombarded with different ideas and discoveries in health products, and theories on how to become healthier. We are finally discovering the causes for many of our health problems that we have faced for years, which has required us to create products and solutions to overcome these problems and improve our lives. While we might have addressed plenty of health related issues, there are still so many we have yet to develop fully. So what is the next step? Captozyme believes that there is more we can do in products and procedures to help improve our health and therefore humankind, and is working to achieve exactly that. Captozyme is a researching company that focuses primarily on anti-nutrients such as oxalate, and developing enzyme products for people with hyperoxaluria and kidney stones.

Hyperoxaluria means that a person has increased urine oxalate, which can cause formation of calcium oxalate, the primary component of most kidney stones. These oxalates can be found in a variety of products that we commonly ingest on a daily basis, and therefore are often unknowingly dangerous to those with hyperoxaluria. At Captozyme we strive to develop ways to administer more of our enzymes in order to decrease the build-up of oxalate, and as a result, assist kidney stone formers in leading healthier lives.